For I was envious of the arrogant, as I saw the prosperity of the wicked.

(Ps. 73:3)

I am thankful for the realistic way in which Scripture represents our struggles. It does not by-pass the agony, doubts, anger, or depression of believers. This characteristic is particularly observable in the book of Psalms. Often, David describes his personal fears and reveals the questions that arose in his heart concerning the purposes of God, especially during times when he was suffering unjustly or facing an enemy that threatened his kingdom and his life.

One of the themes on which David comments many times is the apparent prosperity of the wicked while the righteous are oppressed and ill-treated. There were times, as the context for the verse above illustrates, when David knew that he was not guilty of any great offense toward God, yet his welfare was in jeopardy. At the same time, the king observed that the wicked were enjoying security and advancement. These kinds of situations forced David to recognize his own limitations and concede that the ways of God are sometimes mysterious.

When a believer is passing through a trial, perhaps one in which he is being falsely accused of sin, and he notices that those who are truly guilty of breaking God’s commandments face no particular hardship, it can create considerable turmoil in his heart as he wonders why God is letting him suffer, but letting his guilty neighbor remain untouched. In such circumstances, the believer may have very little insight regarding God’s intentions. How, therefore, should the believer react to this kind of challenge?

There is one essential truth to keep in mind when we are enduring the kind of testing I’ve just described. We must keep our focus on what we know to be true. We know, for example, that God’s nature makes Him incapable of treating His children unjustly or in a manner designed to do them harm just for the sake of harm.

Our eyes and ears may be telling us that we have been abandoned. Our observations may lead us to conclude that God is favoring the wicked over His own child. But, as noted, God’s righteous nature and the everlasting validity of His promises make this kind of explanation absolutely invalid.

When we find ourselves in discouraging situations where our discernment is weak and the test we are facing is severe, we should turn our attention to the nature of God. By doing so, our fears will be subdued and our doubts about God’s regard for us will be vanquished. Dwelling on that which we know to be true—the holy character of God and, therefore, the holy character of His works—establishes stability in our heart. We may not know much about what God is doing at the moment, but we will know that His unchanging nature guarantees that His plan is perfect in all respects.

This is the pattern seen in the writings of David. He reveals the anxiety that has filled his mind and he confesses his doubts regarding God’s activity in his present crisis. But as these Psalms continue, David turns to the nature of God and quickly finds that place of peace and assurance as he reviews the truth of God’s holy character. David creates a proper perspective from which to analyze his trial and that results in a dramatic change in his demeanor.

Simply put, there are times in our lives when faith must overrule sight. There are circumstances in which our perception is flawed and, therefore, we need to find steady ground on which to stand as we consider our predicament. Faith, which is grounded in the trustworthiness of God’s revelation of Himself, is the element that allows us to place our burden of uncertainty before God and wait for His will to run its course.

Remember this important verse: “Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen.” (Heb. 11:1, emphasis added) Your ability to perceive the intentions of God has nothing to do with the stability of your soul during a trial. Your stability, your confidence, your hope, and your expectation rest in the truth of God’s holy nature.

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