In Scripture, the work of redemption is described in various ways. The primary theme associated with the ministry of Christ, however, is peace. The fall of man disrupted the peace of the Garden and immediately set the human race on a course of conflict—conflict with God, of course, but also conflict with one another.

This latter issue is described by God when He confronts our first parents and the serpent. The LORD says that two lines will come forth from the woman—the line of the Deliverer and the line of the serpent. They will engage in continuing battle until the serpent’s head is crushed by the One who will be sent into the world from heaven.

From that point forward, the lack of peace is the dominant concept when man’s nature and relationship with God is discussed. Fallen man has no peace with God; fallen man has no peace with himself. The coming of the Savior, therefore, is frequently described as the arrival of peace, the cessation of conflicts, and the end of hostility throughout God’s creation. The Lord’s appearance is seen as a restoration of that harmony that once characterized God’s creation. In the Savior, fallen man is reconciled to God and enjoys peace once more.

At this time of year, we are commemorating the coming of salvation in the person of Jesus Christ. Traditionally, Advent is a time for reflection upon the state of the world prior to the arrival of the Savior. This reflection is for the purpose of emphasizing the wonderful gift God supplied to us when He sent His Son to redeem us by giving Himself for us.

Please read Isaiah 11:1-10.

The Character of the One to Come

The prophet paints an incredible picture of a future time when One will appear who will have nothing less than a cosmic impact on creation. All aspects of creation are going to be influenced by His coming. Whenever this event occurs, given Isaiah’s description, things will never be the same in this world.

Isaiah speaks about the character of One to come. In the previous chapter, the prophet described this Figure with several titles. Already, therefore, we know this Deliverer will be unlike any other before Him. Isaiah, for example, refers to Him as Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, and Prince of Peace. These designations alone fill the mind with amazement and incredible curiosity. No one has ever walked the earth to whom these titles could be attributed. Now, in our present passage, the prophet adds even more.

A King is coming, one of the house of David—a rightful Ruler who will reign in perfection. If the source of much of the world’s turmoil is injustice and the mistreatment of one against another, then this prediction would be encouraging news, to be sure. Isaiah promises that One will arrive who will reign without fault.

God’s Spirit, he adds, will be upon this Individual. He will excel in wisdom and understanding—because He will have the wisdom of God! He also will be equipped with power and all knowledge; He will fear the LORD, meaning that He will relate to God in a proper manner.

Everything said about this Figure is encouraging and adds to the joy associated with this prediction. Regardless of how bleak things looked in Isaiah’s day, and the situation was most distressing for anyone who truly loved the LORD, this prophecy would revive the hope that righteousness would one day cover the earth, just as Isaiah declared at the beginning of this book.

The Distinctiveness of His Ministry

Note also that Isaiah speaks of the distinctiveness of the Savior’s ministry. Stating again that previous idea, the prophet says the delight of this coming Servant, that is, the thing that will bring Him the most encouragement, is “the fear of the LORD.” He will live to please God and God’s pleasure will be His greatest satisfaction. His work on this earth, therefore, will be marked first and foremost by concern for the will of God. His chief aim will be the accomplishment of God’s desire.

This dedication to the will of God means, of course, that the labor of this Servant will conform to God’s nature and God’s laws. Therefore, Isaiah declares that He will “not judge by what He sees, or decide disputes by what His ears hear.” (v. 3) Here is one of the fundamental issues in the human experience—justice. We are involved with some aspect of justice frequently. We may be the target of a wrongful act or we may be accused of a wrongful act. We may witness evil carried out against the innocent or we may be aware of a scheme to defraud.

Whatever the case, we desire justice—not the kind perverted by our fallen natures, but true justice, the kind that faithfully reflects the character of God. This Deliverer will be distinguished by His dedication to true justice. He will not be influenced by anything other than the pure Word of God. He will not be swayed by what He sees or hears. Instead, as the prophet says, “righteousness” will be the standard of His reign.

This Servant will apply the standard of God and only that standard in His ministry. As a King, indicated as this passage begins, He will instruct and decide and correct according to that which corresponds to the nature of God. It is this standard by which He will judge the poor (cf. v. 4). In true fairness, He will oversee the meek of the earth, Isaiah adds. What more can a poor man with no influence and no means to protect himself from injustice desire other than an impartial judge? What more can he hope for than a judge who is dedicated to truth and who cannot be swayed by bribes or lies or promises of reward?

This Servant of God will be the perfect Ruler! He will dispense justice that is untainted, justice that is pure. For that reason, the poor need have no fear of oppression in His day. All the meek of the earth will have in this Deliverer a source of defense; His reign will be so different from that to which they are accustomed. Now, justice is perverted and bought and manipulated. But the day is coming when these things will no longer be possible.

How will this coming King enforce His will? Will He come with a superior army? Will He subdue through sheer brute force? The prophet explains in a simple fashion how this coming One will assure true justice in His realm: “He will strike the earth with the rod of His mouth, and with the breath of His lips He shall kill the wicked.” (v. 4) With His words this King will establish His rule; with His words He will judge the people; with His words He will ensure that the poor and meek are treated fairly.

By God’s holy standard, the poor will be protected and justice will be guaranteed. For this reason, the wicked should fear, as I noted. In the day of this King, bribery and intimidation will be of no use whatsoever. One will sit in judgment who cannot be influenced except by God’s perfect law. That is the dread of all evil men. If they face an immovable standard of truth and justice, they are doomed.

The Legacy of the Servant

Naturally, such a King is going to create a legacy. He will affect the domain over which He presides. Isaiah gives us some insight regarding what will happen to the world when this Servant comes. He describes a fundamental change in the nature of what we know as those who are born here, live here, and die here. The influence of this Champion of Righteousness will not be limited to talk, but will bear fruit in the lives of those who follow Him; this, in turn, will affect the surroundings where those who follow Him dwell.

The prophet uses some striking images in his description: “the wolf shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the young goat, and the calf and the lion and the fattened calf together . . .” (v. 6) In this sin-corrupted world, wolves eat lambs, leopards eat goats, and lions feast on fattened calves. These descriptions, therefore, are meant to indicate a change at the most fundamental level.

These phrases speak of the removal of hostility between God’s creatures. A reversal of the nature of this world will be affected by the coming of the Savior. This is a typical way in which the Bible instructs us concerning the coming of Christ. His presence marks the end of sin’s reign over God’s creation and the beginning of the reestablishment of harmony.

Moreover, Isaiah says that “a little child shall lead them.” Again, I think he is referring to a fundamental change so that innocence prevails while evil subsides. Isaiah adds additional descriptions in vv. 7 and 8 that are in line with this picture of peace on the earth and the turning back of the aggression that came as a result of the fall of man.

This portion of the prophecy concludes with a wonderful, all-encompassing declaration regarding the result of the Savior’s coming. In v. 9, after another statement describing the harmony that will be realized in that day, the text states that “the earth shall be full of the knowledge of the LORD as the waters cover the sea.” Here you get the impression of a world-wide phenomenon. We saw before that the “weapon” this coming Savior will use is the Word of God. Now we are told that this Word will eventually cover the earth.

Isaiah’s prophecy is being fulfilled as the gospel is preached and God calls His people from every time and every land. Jesus Christ, as Isaiah adds in v. 10, stands now as a signal to the nations. And as the resurrected Jesus taught His disciples in the Great Commission, He is gradually covering the earth with that glorious gospel.

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