Category: Security


. . . in Him you have been made complete . . . (Col. 2:10)

This statement comes in the context of Paul’s encouragement to the Colossians regarding Christ’s triumph on the cross. In the role of our Savior, Jesus was crucified and, in that act, the justice of God was satisfied and the demands of the Law were met. Our sins were paid for, our souls were redeemed, and we no longer live under the condemnation of God.

The fact that Christ represented us, the apostle explains, means that we gain the benefits that He secured. Every charge pending against us was nullified and every need was met in Christ. His atonement was perfect; consequently, there is nothing lacking, nothing to be added, and nothing to be modified. The resurrection of Jesus Christ was the definitive declaration from God that the Son’s sacrifice was accepted and all those on whose behalf the sacrifice was made were eternally secure.

This is our position before God today—no guilt, no fear, no debt, no judgment. We are free in the purest and most magnificent sense of the word. We are free to live in peace, we are free to enjoy what we have been given, we are free to rejoice in God and express our gladness to Him. We are free to sing and praise and pray. We are free to set aside every concern we once had about winning God’s favor. We are free to be who we are in Christ and pay no attention to what others may want us to be. We are free to follow the Word and ignore man-made rules and regulations, and we are free to live in hope of that coming day when we will join our wonderful Savior in heaven.

All of this is what Christ has provided. This is what Paul meant when he wrote: “in Him you have been made complete.” We pay Christ a great honor when we live out our days as a free, sanctified, and confident people. If there is any area in your life in which you are in bondage to the dictates of man, you may cast off those shackles at this very moment in the name of your Savior. If there is any aspect of your life in which fear of condemnation is present, you may reclaim it right now in the name of your Deliverer.

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The Gospel in Psalm 130

July 19, 2015

 

Introduction

Psa. 130:1 A Song of Ascents. Out of the depths I have cried to You, O LORD. 2 Lord, hear my voice! Let Your ears be attentive to the voice of my supplications. 3 If You, LORD, should mark iniquities, O Lord, who could stand? 4 But there is forgiveness with You, that You may be feared. 5 I wait for the LORD, my soul does wait, and in His word do I hope. 6 My soul waits for the Lord more than the watchmen for the morning; indeed, more than the watchmen for the morning. 7 O Israel, hope in the LORD; for with the LORD there is lovingkindness, and with Him is abundant redemption. 8 And He will redeem Israel from all his iniquities.

Based on the text of this Psalm, it seems appropriate to begin with some questions. How many transgressions of all the principles and commandments and precepts that are found in Scripture did you violate last week? What would the list look like if all of your sins, up to this moment in time, had been recorded? How would you like to appear before God and see such a list displayed before Him?

The truth is, you don’t know how many times you’ve violated the holiness of God just since you opened your eyes this morning. Even if we attempted to record all of our sinful thoughts and words and actions for just a day, we would miss most of them. We don’t go through life thinking in terms of cataloging our sins—and for good reason. We don’t have to live like that. But that shouldn’t stop us from considering how often we violate God’s standard and that shouldn’t stop us from meditating, at times, on all the ways in which we sin against God. Such times of reflection can be most beneficial, as we are about to see as we turn our attention to Psa. 130.

This obviously is a prayer offered by a worshiper of God; it is a prayer expressing anguish, to a degree, and relief as the writer acknowledges certain facts about God. These facts, as they are recalled, provide him with a much needed encouragement and corrected perspective on whatever it was that drove him to describe himself as being in the “depths.”

I would note that the first truth that stands out is this writer’s apparent conviction that the LORD establishes the standard by which we are judged, the standard by which our lives are measured. This critical truth comes after the writer’s introductory remarks in which he expresses his distress and his desire that the LORD would hear his supplications. In v. 3, the writer asks a question that carries such momentous implications that I fear we will not be able to grasp them all. The writer of this Psalm asks: “If You, LORD, should mark iniquities, O Lord, who could stand?” Before I talk about the most sobering aspects of this question, I want you to notice that the writer automatically assumes that it is the LORD’s place to decide what is and what is not an iniquity; he assumes that the LORD is the One who sets the standard to which all are held.

The writer does not suggest that if the LORD were to be the One with the authority or right to mark iniquities, we might find ourselves in trouble; he assumes that the LORD is the One whose nature is such that He determines that which constitutes acceptable thinking, speaking, and conduct. This fact, in itself, declares to us something vital concerning God’s nature—His nature is the standard of morality. Whatever God is, that is what it means to be morally upright; whatever contradicts what God is, that is what it means to be morally corrupt and fallen.

With this tremendously important assumption operating, the writer asks his question: “If You, LORD, should mark iniquities, O Lord, who could stand?” If God, whose nature is the standard of judgment in this universe, were to “mark iniquities,” no one would survive, the writer asserts. Let me define two words at this point before we continue. First, the word translated “mark” (shamar) means “to keep” as it to preserve something for an indefinite period of time. Second, the word “iniquities” (avon) means “perversity, depravity, sin.” Now, look again at the question: “If You, LORD, should keep or preserve a record of sins or acts of perversity or thoughts of depravity, O Lord, who could stand?”

I already noted that the writer operates with the assumption that the LORD has the authority to determine the standard by which we are judged. Another assumption, which is obviously held by this writer, is that we are a people characterized by that which qualifies as iniquity. He doesn’t speak as though iniquity is a rare thing; he speaks as though everyone on this earth is characterized by enough iniquity to render them worthy of destruction were the LORD ever to decide to call them to account. This Psalm tells us that God sets the standard and it tells us that He is not like us; we are different from God because we are characterized by various elements that are contrary to His nature; therefore, we deserve judgment—that is a clear message from this writer.

We deserve judgment because we commit violation after violation of God’s standard, and yet we do not perish. Why is this? It is because the LORD is pleased not to mark our iniquities, and He is pleased not to keep a list of our sins current right up to this present moment in time is a running count of accusations against us. He is pleased not to call us to account for our transgressions. Now the writer has revealed a truth about God that should leave us astounded —we are creatures of depravity, but the LORD chooses not to hold our sins against us. He chooses not to mark our iniquities. If we could simply comprehend this one primary point, we would have an understanding of the gospel that would change us forever; we would understand the power of the gospel, the beauty of the gospel, and the comfort of the gospel. The LORD does not mark our iniquities because “there is forgiveness with [Him], that [He] may be feared.” (v. 4)

Forgiveness—that is the explanation. We are characterized by iniquities, but the LORD doesn’t hold on to those transgressions and He doesn’t bring them against us time after time because He forgives us. It’s not that we learn to do better and it’s not that God cares less about His holy character as time goes by and it’s not that our offenses are any less offensive the tenth time we commit them as opposed to the first time. The answer is forgiveness. God forgives us, which means, as the writer’s word structure indicates, that forgiveness is the very opposite of marking iniquities. Knowing that God forgives, the writer states, leads us to fear Him. He uses a Hebrew term (yare) that refers to the deep reverence we have when we stand in awe of something. This word is used extensively in the Old Testament to describe a proper attitude toward God. This fear is not that He will harm us, the fear is reverence, respect, standing in all of the magnificent God of the Bible. To meditate on the forgiveness of God leads to this worshipful attitude; it is an attitude of humility and thanksgiving.

The only way for you to understand the richness of your salvation is to first grasp the enormity of your sin. This is the idea here in our text. The enormity of our sin is revealed when the writer says, in essence, that if we had to answer for our conduct, we would perish; the richness of our salvation is revealed when he says that, instead of being called to account for our sins, God forgives us—which explains, by the way, what forgiveness is; it is relating to the offending party without regard for his sins. Here I must make something absolutely clear; what I want to make absolutely clear is how this kind of situation can exist. I want to make clear how it is that God forgives the guilty.

If anyone ever had a doubt regarding the presence of the gospel in the Old Testament, here is a prime example of how the Old Testament reveals the nature of redemption without speaking as directly about Christ as is the case after the incarnation. We know why the LORD doesn’t mark our iniquities; it is because He forgives us. But we also know that God’s holy nature makes it impossible for Him simply to overlook transgressions. The kind of statement found in this Psalm would have led any pious mind to thoughts about what was taught in the Levitical system, namely, that sins are forgiven on the basis of a substitutionary atonement. If there is forgiveness with God, as this writer says, it is because something has been done about our sins—and that “something” is that God has provided Another to bear the consequences of our iniquities.

As I said before, we do not escape answering for our transgressions because God forgets about them or because He knows that we are “doing our best.” We escape because our Savior takes our place. That is the underlying truth of this portion of Psa. 130. Here is a brief, but truthful reminder of what God had been promising for ages; and the writer of this Psalm relates in a simple fashion the reality of redemption.

This Psalm tells us that God determines the standard to which we are held, that He does not count our transgressions against us even though we violate His standard, and that in the place of destruction God provides forgiveness. Consequently, as the writer goes on to teach, God becomes the focus of his hope (cf. v. 5). Because he knows what the LORD has done, because He knows that the LORD forgives and restores, the writer found great comfort for his soul as he faced hardships. We’ll see in a moment the manner in which he describes this hope, but for now the important point is that the way in which God treats His people makes Him the object of their trust and hope.

This Psalm is a wonderful assertion of some of the primary truths of the gospel. Sinners who are condemned and deserving of destruction are forgiven by the very God against whom they have committed innumerable acts of transgression. Imagine the God who would operate in this manner! Imagine His love and His mercy and His patience.

Clearly, as we’ve seen in many of the other Psalms in this current series, this Psalm tells us that these were people who quickly and confidently turned to the LORD in times of distress. Routinely, these Psalms have given testimony to the fact that the worshipers sought guidance, comfort and confidence from the LORD in the many adverse circumstances they encountered. In this case, the writer describes himself as crying to the LORD “out of the depths.” (v. 1) Whenever this word (“depths”) is used in the Old Testament, it normally refers to the deepest parts of the ocean. Figuratively, therefore, it is used to express a state of great anguish and despair.

Although the writer doesn’t provide specific details concerning his situation, we do have some indication of what was bothering him. After expressing such anguish, he begins speaking of iniquities. It is possible, therefore, that the writer was deeply troubled by his transgressions or those of the nation. For some reason, sin and forgiveness were on his mind when he wrote this song. Rightly, as I noted, he turns to the LORD and pours out his distress in those few words found in vv. 1 and 2. This writer is in a position where only the LORD can help him and it is to the LORD that he directs his cry for assistance.

Those who, along with this writer, worshiped the LORD at this point in history knew the fundamental truth that God is the one to whom we turn in times of distress, especially if that distress is caused by the contemplation of our sin. Where else can we turn to find relief for our troubled soul when, upon the contemplation of our depravity, we find ourselves near despair? The very act of meditating on one’s fallen state quickly leads to the conclusion that there is no help to be found in self—self is the problem! We are sinners and when sinners think soberly on their condition, they certainly do not conclude that deliverance from condemnation and the torment of guilt is to be found in their own devices. It is to the LORD and to Him only that we turn in such moments and it is that perspective that is recorded in this Psalm.

This apparent deliberation on his condition led this writer to a sobering conclusion: “If you, LORD, should mark iniquities, O Lord, who could stand?” (v. 2) Realizing, even to a slight degree, how unfit he was to stand before the LORD, this writer confesses the truth that if the LORD were to require an accounting from him for his transgressions, he would be doomed. And, in fact, the way he states the question makes it obvious that he held this same opinion about all of his countrymen. If the LORD were to keep track of our sins, he says, and then require a reckoning from us, we would be lost. We could not possibly stand before the LORD were He to produce a list of our sins.

Imagine knowing that the LORD was, in fact, marking iniquities, was keeping a record and would demand an accounting. This would be enough to unravel any pious person, or any person who truly wanted to walk before Jehovah in faith. But just as such disturbing thoughts occurred to this writer, he adds that astounding statement in v. 4: “But there is forgiveness with You…”

These worshipers were not free of sin and they were not free of guilt before the LORD, but He was not relating to them based on their sin because with Jehovah there is forgiveness. With Him, there is a remedy for sin—because there is forgiveness with the LORD. What a change of perspectives! If the LORD should mark iniquities, these worshipers knew that they could not endure before Him, but the LORD did not keep a record of their sin in order to bring it against them. Instead, He offered them forgiveness; instead, the LORD, the holy One, the offended One, made a provision for their deliverance.

It’s no wonder that the writer goes on to express how he eagerly waited for the LORD (vv. 5 and 6). As he considered his sin and the fact that the LORD forgave him, he wanted nothing more than to be with the LORD who loved him so. The truth of God’s forgiveness was the hope to which this man held as he made his way through life. It was communion with God that brought this man joy and comfort.

The word translated “wait” (qavah) is interesting (cf. v. 5). It’s a term that refers to remaining or abiding in a specific state as you anticipate something beneficial. When the writer says that he waited for the LORD, he doesn’t mean he was expecting the LORD to show up at some point. He means that he was resting in the LORD. And from that perspective, he was anticipating a time of communion with God, perhaps through worship or perhaps through his departure from this life into the presence of God.

In this frame of mind, the writer could urge his fellow-worshipers to “hope in the LORD.” (v. 7) He could assure them that they served a God who is known for His lovingkindness. In Him, the writer declares, there is “abundant redemption.” He presents a picture of the LORD that is completely uplifting and perfectly suited for those who were on their way to worship Jehovah.

At some point, this writer was made aware of his transgressions or something caused him to pause and think about the fact that he was a sinner and his sins were committed against a God of purity and holiness. And as he was going through this thought process, he realized that he deserved destruction. But there he was—alive and well and able to worship the LORD. The contemplation of his sin led, of course, to the contemplation of God’s forgiveness of his sin. Those two realities—his sin and God’s forgiveness of his sin—overwhelmed him and he had to exclaim praise for the LORD.

If God marked your iniquities, if He kept a record of your sins and called you to account, would you be able to stand? If God took note of your transgressions and preserved a list of them, would you be able to appear before Him with confidence? You know the answer to those questions. Our problem is that we don’t face these kinds of questions often enough. We rarely consider the implications of such a question as: “If You, LORD, should mark iniquities, O Lord, who could stand?”

Meditation on such questions leads inevitably to the conclusion that God forgives—otherwise, we wouldn’t be here and we wouldn’t have a life and we wouldn’t know the LORD. Meditation on what God has done for sinners is where God-honoring worship begins.

When the writer of this Psalm thought on such things, he was moved to fear the LORD. How about you? We don’t hear much talk about fearing the LORD these days. To fear the LORD means that you relate to Him as God, as a holy and righteous God. It means that we look to Him with thankful hearts realizing that He is the One who saves us and who watches over us. To fear the LORD is to stand in awe of Him.

These kinds of thoughts come much more easily when we keep before us the fact that God has forgiven us. It was that truth that caused the writer to find hope in spite of his sins. He knew that God had provided for his forgiveness. As I said before, the gospel is portrayed in Psa. 130. There is the undeniable teaching of atonement in this Psalm. There is recognition of sin and there is recognition of forgiveness—the two key elements in redemption.

Therefore, we cannot study this Psalm without being directed to Christ. There is no way to read this Psalm and even begin to have the slightest understanding of it without turning our eyes to Christ. It is impossible for us to think about our transgression and breathe a sigh of relief knowing that they have been forgiven without turning our minds to Christ. He is the explanation for sins forgiven. The Messiah is the explanation for this writer’s conclusion that, although he was a man of iniquity, there was forgiveness with the LORD. Amen.

May God richly bless the hurting in Charleston. May His peace be upon you in abundance. May His strength be your stay and His shadow your refuge. May His Word be your hope and His Spirit your Comforter.

As I have come to understand the nature of the gospel more completely over the years, one of the aspects that inspires, excites, humbles, and encourages me most is found in the depiction of the Body of Christ given in the Book of the Revelation. In the fifth chapter, there is a description of the Church of the Savior that is breathtaking and comforting, especially during these days of unrest. I often remind myself that this is what the people of God look like from heaven’s perspective. This is what I preach for, pray for, and long for. This is what should be in our hearts and this is what we should strive for in our personal lives and ministries.

All travelers, one final destination. All people, one supernatural Kingdom. All races, one shed blood. All sinners, one glorious Savior.

Rev. 5:6 And I saw between the throne (with the four living creatures) and the elders a Lamb standing, as if slain, having seven horns and seven eyes, which are the seven Spirits of God, sent out into all the earth. 7 And He came and took the book out of the right hand of Him who sat on the throne. 8 When He had taken the book, the four living creatures and the twenty-four elders fell down before the Lamb, each one holding a harp and golden bowls full of incense, which are the prayers of the saints. 9 And they sang a new song, saying, “Worthy are You to take the book and to break its seals; for You were slain, and purchased for God with Your blood men from every tribe and tongue and people and nation. 10 You have made them to be a kingdom and priests to our God; and they will reign upon the earth.”

Churches may, indeed, soon face more vicious forms of government sanctioned persecution in this country. This is not something new, nor should it surprise us. (Matt. 5:10-12; John 15:20-23) Let us be sure of one thing, however: the Church of Jesus Christ, over which He is Head (Eph. 1:18-23), will never cease to exist on the earth. (1 Cor. 15:22-28) The people of God do not have to have buildings and public meetings to carry on the work of the gospel, which is the one unique and glorious thing about this message– it does not deal only with external behavior, but is the power of God to penetrate to the very soul and no opposition, seen or unseen, will ever succeed in stopping it. (Rom. 1:16; Heb. 4:12, 13) You can forbid people to meet and you can destroy our buildings and you can threaten us all you want, but the gospel will continue to be applied to the human race according to the sovereign decree of God and then it will be over–and not a millisecond before God has done whatsoever He pleases with this world. (2 Pet. 3:3-10) Rave on God-haters. He who sits in the heavens is laughing at you. (Psa. 2:1-4) You are only storing up wrath for that great Day. (Rom. 2:5-8)

Living in Peace

In my recent Advent devotionals, I have been concentrating on the concept of peace, which is closely associated with the coming of the Savior. This is not the kind of peace we normally think of in this world. This term describes the state of being free of condemnation before God and, therefore, enjoying all of His blessings in this life and the next through His Son, Jesus Christ.

We considered the promise of peace made by the prophet Isaiah in which he describes a cosmic transformation of the nature of this fallen world. And one of the issues on which he concentrates in his prophecy is the piece that Christ will bring to mankind when He arrives. That peace, in fact, will dramatically affect the way in which people treat one another and, in time, have significant influence on the whole human race.

In the second devotional, we looked at the declaration of peace found in Luke’s Gospel. As he reported on the birth of Christ, Luke included a wonderful story about shepherds who were visited by an angel out in the fields one night. The culmination of that announcement, during which the single angel was joined by a myriad of others, was that declaration of peace on earth as a result of the Baby’s recent birth. Once again, the worldwide impact is emphasized in the announcement made by the heavenly beings.

In the third devotional, we looked at the means of peace, also described in Luke’s account. Through an obscure figure, a man named Simeon, and for the first time in the birth narrative, the coming struggle between good and evil, between heaven and hell, was mentioned as this man spoke a short word regarding the future of the Baby Jesus. His coming would result in building up and tearing down, in salvation and condemnation. By declaring the Word of God to the world and offering Himself as a sacrifice for the sins of His people, the Savior would bring about the peace promised by Isaiah in the peace declared by the angels.

Today, we want to look at some statements from Jesus Himself concerning this matter of peace. We’re going to consider one statement made by Him before the cross and one made by Him after the cross.

John 14:27 “Peace I leave with you; My peace I give to you; not as the world gives do I give to you. Do not let your heart be troubled, nor let it be fearful.”

Before commenting on this statement, I want to establish the context. At the end of chapter 13, Jesus has a brief exchange with the apostle Peter. The Savior has indicated to His disciples that He soon will be leaving them. Jesus commands His disciples to distinguish themselves by their love for one another. He declares that “all men will know that you are My disciples, if you have love for one another.” (13:35) Peter’s mind, however, seems to be focused on the coming departure of the Lord. Without commenting on the Savior’s admonition regarding love for one another, Peter asked: “Lord, where are You going?” He is told that he cannot follow the Savior, yet Peter insisted, “Lord, why can I not follow You right now? I will lay down my life for you.” At that point, Jesus predicts Peter’s denial that will take place when the Savior is arrested.

This is the background going into chapter 14 where the tone of the Lord’s remarks changed immediately to that of great comfort and encouragement. He knows that His disciples are troubled as they contemplate what He has just revealed to them. He urges them, nevertheless, to remain faithful. And He promises that He will go to prepare a place for them and, one day, receive His disciples to Himself so they might be with Him forever.

As this dialogue continues, Jesus assures His disciples that they are destined to do great things in service to Him and His kingdom. He again asserts the necessity of love manifested between them so that they might prove that they are, indeed, His followers. It is then that Jesus makes them aware of the Helper that will be sent from heaven to dwell with them and enable them to serve honorably and effectively. Immediately after the promise of the Holy Spirit, Jesus speaks the words found in verse 27.

Imagine how anti-climactic this statement from Jesus would be if He were simply referring to peace as the world typically thinks of peace. He is not promising the end of their personal struggles with one another, nor is the Savior promising that they will have a life of political tranquility. He is declaring to the disciples that they will live and serve within the context of a loving and eternal relationship with Him and His Father in heaven. This spiritual peace, as we have seen in previously, is directly tied to the fact that their accounts will be settled with God. They will be able to live out their days knowing that they are part of God’s redeemed family and that truth would provide them with confidence, determination, and purpose. They will be able to do wonderful things, just as Jesus predicted before, because they will be servants of the Most High. They will know His benevolence, mercy, provision, protection, and forgiveness.

With this truth firmly established in their hearts, the disciples could go forth and live triumphantly regardless of obstacles that they might encounter in the days and years to come. No matter what they face, they will be forever secure in the hands of God. Knowledge of this would be the source of contentment and courage as they set forth to build the kingdom of Christ. Nothing they encounter will shake their standing before God and nothing will be able to change the bonds of love between them, the Savior, and the Father, which Jesus will soon attain.

During this past year, how many times has your heart been troubled? How many times have you been fearful due to unpleasant or unexpected circumstances? Listen to what the Savior says after making this promise of peace to His disciples: “Do not let your heart be troubled, nor let it be fearful.” This was not just wishful thinking on Christ’s part. He was not simply trying to rally His troops in light of the coming ordeal of the cross. Jesus is telling His followers that they will know spiritual harmony and they will know the kind of security with God that is based in His sovereign nature and omnipotence. And they will live with this knowledge regardless of what this world throws at them, regardless of what challenges come their way, and regardless of what the enemies of the Savior might threaten or do.

When your heart is troubled, when your heart is fearful, this is where you turn. You turn to these wonderful declarations of our peace with God in Christ Jesus. You turn to these promises made by Jesus Himself before He went to the cross to pay for your sins and to remove the enmity between you and God. The peace that Jesus attained for us is a magnificent gift that we so desperately need to grasp and cherish in this sinful world. We will not escape trials, nor will we escape many painful episodes during our lifetime. But there is nothing, regardless of how painful or ferocious or cleverly designed by our adversary, that can disrupt our peace with God. This is a truth to which we should turn frequently, especially during those times when we grow weary or feel like we are going to be undone even as we attempt to live lives of honor and glory before God.

John 20: 19 So when it was evening on that day, the first day of the week, and when the doors were shut where the disciples were, for fear of the Jews, Jesus came and stood in their midst and said to them, “Peace be with you.” 20 And when He had said this, He showed them both His hands and His side. The disciples then rejoiced when they saw the Lord. 21 So Jesus said to them again, “Peace be with you; as the Father has sent Me, I also send you.”

Once again let’s give our attention to the context of these verses. The 20th chapter of the Gospel of John records the event of the resurrection of Jesus Christ. John begins his report by telling us that Mary Magdalene made her way to the tomb of the Savior early that Sunday morning. While it was still dark, she arrived and discovered that the stone covering the entrance to the burial site had been removed. Mary’s assumption was that someone had taken the body of the Lord. This prompted Peter and John to run to the tomb to investigate what they were been told. They too found that the body of Jesus was no longer there.

Just as Mary explained to two angels that she was weeping because her Lord had been taken away, Jesus appeared before her. At first, Mary did not know it was Jesus, but when He called her by name, she recognized the voice of her Savior and began clinging to Him. After that, Mary made her way to the disciples and announced that she had seen the Lord and that he had sent a message to them, which she repeated. This is where our passage appears. Jesus has been to the cross, has suffered, has surrendered His life for the sake of His people, and has now been raised from the dead in triumph over death itself.

Still coping with the astonishing developments of that Sunday morning, John tells us that toward the end of the day, the disciples had taken refuge and were, in essence, hiding for fear of the Jews. Obviously, the disciples suspected that the Jews might now begin rounding up the followers of Christ, especially if they could use the excuse that these men had stolen the body of Jesus. The boldness and the discernment that will come to characterize these men soon enough is not yet present. But as they pondered recent events, “Jesus came and stood in their midst and said to them, ‘Peace be with you.’”

What is the one thing that the frightened disciples needed at that very moment? They needed to have their hearts calmed the by the manifestation of God’s peace. And that is what Jesus announced to them. He had accomplished His mission and the peace that He promised was now theirs to enjoy. How strange it would be to continue in the fear of man when your Savior has just overcome death itself! The disciples needed to hear Jesus make that declaration. They needed to know that He was no longer dead, which meant that no earthly power or spiritual authority could bring Christ into subjection. On the contrary, He has just demonstrated that He has all power and all authority in heaven and on earth. Therefore, the only acceptable state in which His disciples could now exist was that of peace—peace with God.

Having pronounced peace upon them, the text says that Jesus then “show them both His hands and His side.” He proved to His disciples that He was indeed their Master, the One crucified upon the cross, taken down after giving up His life, and laid in the tomb. That tomb was now empty because He lived again. Realizing that this was, indeed, their risen Lord, the disciples rejoiced, John tells us. Can you comprehend the astonishment that must have filled the heart of the disciples? They must have been gloriously perplexed as they processed the truth of Christ’s victory over death. They must have believed and yet continued to wonder how such a thing could be. Their souls overflowed with gladness even as they continued to gaze upon the Savior in elated amazement.

John tells us that Jesus spoke again: “Peace be with you; as a Father has sent Me, I also send you.” And here we see another dimension of the peace that Christ attained for His disciples. They will soon go forth, not to return to their previous lives, but to continue the work of the Savior. The peace that Christ has established between them and God will now allow them to become His servants on the earth. Because of the atonement, these disciples are fit to become instruments in the hands of God as He continues to reveal His plan of redemption to the world.

Once they were enemies of God and doomed, but now they are children of God and destined to spend eternity in His comfortable presence. That which made such a dramatic alteration of their standing before God was the death and resurrection of Christ, facts that had now been confirmed before their very eyes. Before they faced the wrath of God, but now they will be enveloped in the love of God. Before they were worthless to the cause of truth and righteousness, but now they are going to become the heralds of God’s truth and righteousness.

Let me assure you, that it is no different for you. Because of what Christ did for you, you are no longer at enmity with God, but are now His beloved son or daughter. Because of what Christ did for you, you are no longer unable and unwilling to serve God, but are now able and eager to honor God with all your mind and all your strength. Because Jesus has made peace between you and God, you not only can serve Him, but you can serve His purposes for the rest of your days. Jesus took that which was dead and gave it life. Jesus took that which was spiritually corrupted and made it pure. Jesus took that which had no use in the kingdom of God and made it a precious treasure in the eyes of the King. That is what Jesus did for you and that is the truth in which you must ground your thinking day after day so that you are not undone by self-doubt or criticism or failure or fear.

Do not live a life full of apprehension, live a life characterized by confidence. Do not live a life that is unsteady and wavering, live a life that manifests stability and certainty. In other words, as you continue through this season of commemorating the birth of our Savior, commit yourself to a life grounded in daily evidences of that which He secured for us, even eternal peace with God.

Imperishable

From Pastor Bordwine

 

“I give eternal life to them, and they will never perish;

and no one will snatch them out of My hand.”

(John 10:28)

Recently, a woman relayed to me the sad story of how her marriage had ended. She had been with her husband for 30 years when, without warning, he announced that he wanted a divorce. This woman was astonished, of course, because, as she said, she had assumed that this relationship would continue until death. She admitted, therefore, that she had taken her marriage for granted because it had endured for so long.

I would not find fault with this woman for the assumption she made regarding her marriage. From her perspective, she had every reason to feel secure. The woman had no way of predicting what her husband was going to do. This story illustrates a miserable truth regarding this life: Even our most cherished relationships are vulnerable.

There is one wonderful exception, however, and that is our relationship with Christ. Our union with Christ is forever. This fallen environment cannot weaken or destroy our salvation. This makes our relationship with the Savior all the more precious and a source of tremendous confidence and peace.

There one basic element in our relationship with Christ that makes it indestructible. The truth is that God chose us, we did not choose Him. He established our relationship with His Son. We were incapable of establishing such a relationship. This means that the attributes of God are responsible for safeguarding our union. God’s unequaled power, for example, protects us from all assaults. Unless there is a power somewhere in creation that is greater, we can rest assured that we are eternally secure.

The nature of our salvation, therefore, should be of great encouragement as we live out our days on the earth. We need never doubt our everlasting redemption. We have no reason to question the end of our spiritual journey. We will arrive in heaven just as surely as if we were already there. We should also be fully convinced of our safety as we seek to live as servants of Christ. We do not have to worry about being overcome by the adversary regardless of how ferocious he may sound.

Living in the context of our relationship with Christ offers all of these advantages and more. When we face obstacles or encounter hostility as we learn and do the will of God, we should remember that all obstacles, all hostility, and all threats have already been met by our Savior and they have been defeated.

The next time you find yourself struggling with some aspect of your Christian life or the next time you face hostility due to your Christian convictions, return to the truth of your safety in Christ. There you will find courage to face what may be a frightening situation. There you will find strength to rise up and try again. And there you will find God’s wisdom that will enlighten you and guide you so that you might glorify the Father and the Son.

And by all means, hide these words of the Savior in your heart and believe them and rejoice in them:

“My sheep hear My voice, and I know them, and they follow Me; and I give eternal life to them, and they will never perish; and no one will snatch them out of My hand. My Father, who has given them to Me, is greater than all; and no one is able to snatch them out of the Father’s hand. I and the Father are one.” (John 10:29-30)

Our union with Jesus Christ is imperishable. Glory to God!